Discover the Old

If you know me by now, you probably realize when I see something interesting I want to explore it!  Some people are content in exploring things with our vast internet options but for me using my God given senses is how I choose to take on adventure! Long after my body has failed, my mind will be able to relive all these wonderful things I have seen.

One day while working near St. Regis, Montana I took a detour onto several side and frontage roads.  I will be honest, this was long enough ago I can’t remember the name of the road I took but doesn’t that lead to the allure?  If memory is correct this is a stretch of Dry Creek Road, east of St. Regis but not as far as Superior.

When I was driving this magnificent area, I passed an old cement bridge.  Long since its useful days the slight structure stood off the ground in almost a grumpy stature.  The portion of the bridge that went over the gravel roadway was missing but the heavy beams and most of the structure stood fairly intact.

I pulled my vehicle out of the way and parked under an old growth tree with plenty of canvasing shade.  I stood there for a long time looking at the old bridge.  I wondered if it had been a road way, maybe the old road system, maybe a railroad bridge.  “Why was the bridge here?” was an obvious question but I didn’t have time to answer.  I just chose to “be” and enjoy my little find.  At this point in time many of the surrounding areas showed no real reason for the structure being there.  As with most things, ole nature had taken back its area.

 

There was a shear cliff to the northeast, some remnants of a rib cage and spine, and the old bridge marking of “1914”.  I will confess I didn’t do a lot of research on the bridge.  In this instance I just chose to enjoy the old structure.  I walked around it and studied the etches and cracks.  Much like our elders this old structure had many stories I wished to know but probably will never find out.  That was okay with me though.  Sometimes we just need to enjoy the moment.

I let the area and the trees do some talking as I listened to the passing river and the swaying trees.  I found no sign of railroad usage but maybe remnants of that were long gone.  A steep climb got me to the top of the bridge without too much effort.  I enjoyed standing on the bridge and looking down.  It sure seemed taller when you were looking from this angle!  With the portion of the bridge missing I chose to walk east considering that is the side of the bridge I was on.   I followed what appeared to be an old roadway for as long as I could until the road ceased to be even a couple feet wide and the rest disappeared into the hill side.  Some of the road appeared to be used in spots for fire breaks.  I caught a glimpse of a very unique dark green, circular cabin built into a hill about half a mile from the bridge and about a quarter mile straight up a hill.

I wasn’t disappointed to not learn much about my new friend.  I was glad to pay tribute to a time passed.  This old structure had served some purpose in its day that I’m sure was very worthy.  I’m sure you might laugh, if you could see me, when I’m by myself.  I tend to speak to things I find like I would another person.  In my mind this old bridge is no different then our elders sitting a home just hoping they can grab someone’s ear to tell them a story.

While I didn’t learn much I feel fortunate I stopped and enjoyed a little nook and cranny of the the beautiful state of Montana that will one day soon be lost forever. Take this as a lesson to not take that older gentleman or that elderly woman for granted. They too, just like this old bridge, wish deeply someone would just stop and listen…

4 Comments
  1. I enjoy reading about the interesting places you find on your travels. You describe them so well that it feels like I’m right there. I am always curious about the history of old abandoned places and how they came to be abandoned. This is why I love exploring the desert and out of way places.

    Like

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